32 EQ

well i have spent a great deal of time with these and i think we are talking true love: )~

after having received a load of email and some PMs from different sites asking as to my thoughts on the "vintage" feedback design, verses the non-feedback option, i decided i had to spend some time bouncing between.

after spending some time listening, here are some thoughts that will be in the coming review.

i have gone back and forth between feedback in and out, the difference are oh so subtle, in my humble estimations i would not have offered it as a option. just me.

with the feedback out, the Harrison 32EQ sounds a very slight bit rounder, and i would even go so far as to say for the most part, a bit more to my liking, if i had to choose.

with the feedback in, the Harrison 32EQ sounds a hair bit more present, or maybe better described as maybe a bit more forward sounding in the upper register, just a tad of edge?  

i did feel this was a very very very bit, nice for some, vocals.

the two settings, are again, oh so very subtile in there differences.

those with really nice monitors will hear the slight differences, as well, i would suspect a great many will not notice much of, if any difference.

if any one wants to try and see the difference, here is a link to Dan site and a link to he diagrams offering the feedback option in and out.

http://www.greatriverelectronics.com/product.cfm?ID=31&type=0#

http://www.greatriverelectronics.com/PDF/32EQ%20feedback%20jumper%20sheet.pdf

32EQ feedback in or out?

i understand the originals were feedback in to make up for possible short comings of the training. that just does not seem to be the case with the Great River addition of the Harrison 32EQ, so, why make it a option on the Great River addition?

i have gone back and forth between feedback in and out, the difference are oh so subtle, in my humble estimations i would not have offered it as a option. just me.

with the feedback out the Harrison 32EQ sounds a very slight bit rounder, and i would even go so far as to say for the most part a bit more to my liking if i had to choose.

with the feedback in the Harrison 32EQ sounds a hair bit more present maybe a bit more forward sounding in the upper register?  

i did feel this was a very very bit nice for some, vocals.

the two settings are again, offer very subtile differences.

those with really nice monitor will hear the slight differences, as well, i would suspect many will not notice much if any difference.

Hi Pan,

Glad to hear you like the EQs!

Here are my thoughts about the design of the EQs, and our partnership  

with Great River.  I hope you can use some of it.

As you know, Harrison makes large-format consoles and not rackmount  

gear.  We often discussed the possibility of making "standalone"  

products based on our designs.  But our manufacturing, engineering,  

support, and sales/marketing expertise is in large consoles.  We watched  

as some other console manufacturers struggled when trying to make  

smaller products that met user's expectations.  So we went looking for a  

partner to take our designs and re-implement them in a smaller  

form-factor.  We called a couple of purveyors of high-end recording gear  

and told them what we wanted to do.  Each store gave us a short list of  

manufacturers that made very high quality products and would maintain  

our reputation.  Dan was on everyone's list, so we figured we'd try him  

first.  It turned out to be a really good match.

The design of the GR 32EQ requires some fairly unusual/expensive parts  

so that it can have a really wide range on the filters and EQ bands.   

We've had lots of comments over the years that our EQs have very usable  

ranges that were clearly designed by someone with practical experience.  

The band ranges and the amount of overlap between them were chosen by  

Dave Harrison after his own experience (Dave engineered some James Brown  

recordings, among others).  Dave designed most of the early MCI  

consoles.  So while the 32Series was the first "Harrison" branded  

console, he already had quite a few consoles under his belt when it was  

developed.  

The GR 32EQs are the same circuit as the original consoles, except that  

some higher-quality modern parts are used.  We had a short discussion  

about whether we should try to exactly recreate the sound of the  

original 32, but our chief analog designer (who designed the EQ of the  

32 Series and subsequent consoles) would have none of it.  The parts  

available now are what he "would have used" if they were available.  For  

that matter, nearly every old Harrison console still in service has had  

these parts replaced long ago, so we feel we are being true to the sound  

people are currently hearing/seeking in a Harrison console.  The circuit  

is unchanged but some of the parts have been upgraded.

We made one slight addition to the circuit:  the GR 32EQ incorporates a  

transformer in the output which was not strictly part of the console EQ  

section, but there was a transformer on the output(s) of the console  

strip so we felt it was important to include the transformer and  

maintain the sound of the original console.  One more subtlety:  the  

original design had a feedback circuit around the transformer which made  

it more linear.  We weren't sure if this would be needed with the new  

parts.  Dan designed it in as a jumper-selectable option, and it turned  

out that it was not needed.  I think the jumper pins are still there for  

those who are interested in trying it out.  (Dan?)

In the very end, when we got the final prototypes, we tested them using  

the same test gear and methods we used in the original consoles.  They  

matched our expectations perfectly.  Our only suggestion was to change  

the in/out switches to a model with properties more similar to the original.

Regarding the 500-format:   the resellers that we called suggested this  

format.  I think it's very popular right now, and it helps us to keep  

the price low.  Our goal at the moment is to introduce as many people as  

possible to the Harrison sound.  We've focused on the "film" industry  

for so long that we found many music engineers were no longer familiar  

with our name or sound.  So we're trying to change that.

Personally I've worked at the company "only" about 10 years.   I started  

off as the GUI developer for our IKIS console software, and have  

gradually moved into general product development, including our Mixbus  

workstation and the licensed products by Great River and Universal  

Audio.  I don't have any "analog" chops myself, but we have guys here  

who have been designing these circuits.  Our chief analog designer jokes  

that he has auditioned thousands of eq circuits.  Actually, he may not  

be joking, seeing how he's done design work for about 40 consoles during  

his tenure.

Regarding the Harrison company, our history is at:   

http://www.harrisonconsoles.com (click on History)

I'm available pretty much all day, every day if you'd like to call and  

talk sometime.

Best,

Ben Loftis

Harrison Consoles

615-641-7200

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